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2 edition of Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis found in the catalog.

Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis

Ann Pearson

Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis

by Ann Pearson

  • 11 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering in Woods Hole, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radiocarbon.,
  • Biochemical markers.,
  • Biogeochemistry.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Ann Pearson.
    SeriesMIT/WHOI -- 00-01., MIT/WHOI (Series) -- 2000-01.
    ContributionsMassachusetts Institute of Technology., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution., Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination347 p. :
    Number of Pages347
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15574166M

      This review provides current state of the art of compound‐specific stable‐isotope‐ratio mass spectrometry (δ 13 C) and gives an overview on innovative applications in soil science. After a short introduction on the background of stable C isotopes and their ecological significance, different techniques for compound‐specific stable‐isotope analysis are compared. Application results: For a natural radiocarbon simulation, an equilibrium solution was obtained in 23 model-years, a dramatic decrease from the model-years reported for time-stepping. The modeled circulation in the deep Pacific Ocean produced radiocarbon ages twice those of observations.

    Email Website Campus: Newark School: SAS-N Dept. Affiliation: Earth & Environmental Sciences. Dr. Kristina Keating’s research focuses on using near surface geophysics to investi. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been extended to the 32 S and 34 S stable isotopes of sulfur (δ 34 S) through the combination of gas chromatography (GC) and multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The molecular level resolution of sulfur-CSIA is greatly expanding the biogeochemical applications ofexisting sulfur isotope methods, particularly with respect.

      Abstract. This chapter focuses on how radiocarbon (14 C) is used both as a tracer of source pools and for determining age on multiple time scales, providing a powerful approach for understanding the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems.A range of applications is introduced, from estimating the lifespan of whole organisms to using the age of respired carbon (C) to partition sources . Radiocarbon distribution in the environment. The Δ 14 C ranges are approximate and serve to illustrate the large dynamic radiocarbon range among different carbon reservoirs (see Box 1 for explanation of radiocarbon units). For suspended particulate organic carbon in the ocean, the gradient illustrates that Δ 14 C values become more negative with depth (lower 14 C content).


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Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis by Ann Pearson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biogeochemical Applications of Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analysis. Article (PDF Available) their applications as biomarker lipids, and the development and application of proxies based on Author: Ann Pearson.

Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis. By Ann Pearson. Download PDF (20 MB) Abstract. Compound-specific carbon isotopic (C and A14C) data are reported for lipid biomarkers isolated from Santa Monica Basin (SMB) and Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) surface sediments.

Author: Ann Pearson. Biogeochemical applications of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis. By Ann Pearson. Cite. BibTex; Full citation; Publisher: Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Year: DOI identifier: // OAI identifier: Provided by: MUCC Author: Ann Pearson. The challenges associated with sample preparation for compound-specific Δ 14 C measurements will be discussed in this contribution. Several years of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis have revealed that in most natural samples, purified organic compounds consist of heterogeneous mixtures of the same by: Radiocarbon isotopic approaches and compound‐specific techniques resolve the input, metabolic fate, and turnover time of OC in ecosystems ranging in size from streams to the open ocean.

Accumulating evidence suggests that aquatic OC is composed of diverse biogeochemical by: Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of amino acids (AAs) is of great interest as a proxy for organic nitrogen (N) cycling rates, dating archeological bone collagen, and investigating processes shaping the biogeochemistry of global N reservoirs.

However, recoverable quantities of individual compounds from natural samples are often insufficient for radiocarbon (14C) analyses. 1. Introduction. The recently developed compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) technique using preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) is a powerful tool for elucidation of the origin and fate of organic carbon in the environment.Some researchers in particular should find this technique useful as an alternative tool for dating carbonate fossils from marine.

Compound-Specific Radiocarbon An alysis (CSRA) Thanks to a technical development allowing 14 C analys is of samples containing micrograms of car- bon, 14 C analysis at the molecular le vel became.

Pavel P Povinec, A E Litherland, Karl F von Reden, Developments in Radiocarbon Technologies: From the Libby Counter to Compound-Specific AMS Analyses, Radiocarbon, /S, 51, 01, (), (). This study demonstrates use of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) for dating Holocene lacustrine sediments from carbonate-hosted Ordy Pond, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i.

Long-chain odd-numbered normal alkanes (n-alkanes), biomarkers characteristic of terrestrial higher plants, were ubiquitous in Ordy Pond sediments. The δ13C of individual n-alkanes ranged from − to −‰. We have improved a method for isolation and purification of individual amino acids for compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA).

To remove high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) eluent blanks from isolated amino acid fractions prior to the radiocarbon (Δ14C) measurement, each fraction was filtered through a membrane filter and then washed with diethyl ether twice. Compound-specific radiocarbon dating was successfully applied to develop a refined chronology for Ross Sea sediments.

In contrast to radiocarbon dating of bulk organic matter, this approach requires technical knowledge both on the purification of target compounds from complex organic matrices and radiocarbon dating of small-size samples. Introduction [2] Radiocarbon analysis has been used since the s for dating purposes, but it is only since the development of accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS) in the s that sample size requirements have been reduced to the extent that compound‐specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) has become possible [Eglinton et al., ].

A new setup for the preparation of atmospheric methane samples for radiocarbon analysis is presented. The system combines a methane preconcentration line with a preparative gas chromatography technique to isolate pure methane samples for a compound-specific radiocarbon analysis.

Yu Liu, Xufeng Zhang, Ying Li and Haixia Wang, The application of compound‐specific isotope analysis of fatty acids for traceability of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in the coastal areas of China, Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 97, 14, (), ().

Direct application of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of leaf waxes to establish lacustrine sediment chronology. View/ Open. JOPL_pdf (Kb). BIOGEOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS by Ann Pearson Submitted on October 1,in partial fulfillment ofthe requirements for the degree of Doctor ofPhilosophy at the Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Tracing of biogeochemical pathways using molecular approaches has advanced our basic understanding of the carbon cycle and life’s legacy in the sedimentary record.

To this end, compound-specific radiocarbon analysis has been instrumental in shedding light on the turnover, age, and sources of a range of biomarkers embedded within complex environmental matrices. Comprehensive radiocarbon analysis of benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) derived from pyrogenic carbon in environmental samples - Volume 59 Issue 4 - U M Hanke, L Wacker, N Haghipour, M W I Schmidt, T I Eglinton, C P McIntyre.

research papers, two textbooks and four book chapters. He is widely credited with inventing compound-specific isotope analysis, which utterly transformed the use of stable isotopes as tracers in organic molecules.

He performed field work around the globe. fers between these bulk pools of carbon. The utility of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) has been demonstrated for marine sediments (e.g. Eglinton et al. ; Pearson et al. ; Ohkouchi et al.

), but analytical constraints lo ng prevented application. Ingalls, A. E. & Pearson, A. Ten years of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis. Oceanogra 18–31 (). Article Google Scholar.Books. Publishing Support. Login. Reset your password. If you have a user account, you will need to reset your password the next time you login.

You will only need to do this once. Find out more. IOPscience login / Sign Up. Please note.